Cutting New Paths toward Faculty Development

Date: March 19, 2008

Keynote Workshop

Developing the Professional Network: “Mutual Mentoring” in Academe
Dr. Mary Deane Sorcinelli

In this interactive session, participants will identify what they actually mean by mentoring, look at how our own experiences as “mentees” shape how we value mentoring in academia, and explore what an “ideal” mentoring network might look like for faculty at various stages of the academic career.

In the literature of faculty development, mentoring is usually mentioned as a vital contribution to a successful academic career, particularly for women and faculty of color. The most common form of mentoring has been a “traditional model,” which is defined by a one-on-one relationship between an experienced faculty member who guides and supports the career development of an early career faculty member. Recent literature, however, has indicated the emergence of new, more flexible approaches to mentoring in which new and experienced faculty work with “multiple mentors,” “constellations” of mentors, “networks” of mentors, or a “portfolio” of mentors who address a variety of career competencies. In this interactive session, participants will identify what they actually mean by mentoring, look at how our own experiences as “mentees” shape how we value mentoring in academia, and explore what an “ideal” mentoring network might look like for faculty at various stages of the academic career.

Breakout Sessions

When Mentoring Is the Medium: Lessons Learned from a Faculty Development Initiative
Dr. Mary Deane Sorcinelli

How can institutions frame mentoring as a broader faculty development initiative in which faculty at all stages of the academic career can teach and learn from each other? This session addresses the question above through discussion of the goals, design, and lessons learned from a “Mutual Mentoring Initiative” at the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

Designing Professional Development for Mid-Career Faculty: Principles and Approaches
Dr. Roger Baldwin and Dr. Deborah DeZure

There is a robust literature on both faculty career stages and faculty development that can be used to guide professional development practice. In this session, the presenters will review key challenges and concerns for mid-career faculty as well as guiding principles in faculty development. Session participants will then engage in case studies and problem-solving to design productive professional development opportunities for mid-career faculty.

Faculty Development and Engaged Scholarship
Dr. Hiram E. Fitzgerald; Burton A. Bargerstock; Dr. Diane M. Doberneck; Robert E. Brown; Dr. Dozier W. Thornton; Angela D. Allen

Universities are increasingly asked to engage with society in addressing its concerns and to account for their contributions to the public good. Engaged scholarship occurs when faculty conduct some of their research, teaching, and service in partnership with communities, organizations, agencies, schools, and businesses. Presenters will discuss strategies to promote the professional development of faculty and graduate students both for and through engaged scholarship.

Thinking Differently About Department Chairs: Supporting The Changing Role of Faculty
Dr. Marilyn Amey

If the roles of faculty are changing, so too may be the work of department chairs. This interactive session will explore the ways in which a changing faculty labor market affects the work of department chairs. Creating an environment for professional development and change, multi-year planning, connecting college and department goals to those of individual faculty, alternative staffing such as part-time and adjuncts, meeting the different generational needs of faculty, and managing the work are topics of interest for this session.

Technology Integration: Challenges & Opportunities
Dr. Punya Mishra and Dr. Matthew J. Koehler

Technology has become “one more thing” that faculty members have to deal with as they engage in scholarship and teaching. Technology offers new opportunities for teaching but also demands a significant investment of resources, time, effort, money. In this interactive session presenters will lead a discussion on some of the issues facing the professoriate as they seek to integrate technology in their teaching and professional development. Of particular interest would technology integration in teaching, models of professional development, use of newer technologies such as mobile media and web 2.0.

Co-Sponsors

  • The Richard Lee Featherstone Society
  • National Center for the Study of University Engagement and MSU University Outreach and Engagement
  • MSU Graduate School
  • Office for Inclusion and Intercultural Activities
  • Office of Faculty and Organizational Development
  • Program in Higher, Adult, and Lifelong Education
  • Women’s Resource Center